Traditional recipes

What Makes You Qualify as a ‘Lightweight’?

What Makes You Qualify as a ‘Lightweight’?

Being a lightweight is both good and bad

Shutterstock/Vaclav Mach

If you start to feel tipsy after one cocktail, this is for you.

Determining whether or not you’re a lightweight is fairly simple. Besides, sometimes lightweights get a bad rep, but in our opinion, being one has its benefits.

There are two kinds of lightweights out there. First, there are those people who threw back drink after drink in college without feeling tipsy, but slowly came to realize after graduation that they couldn’t have a single glass of wine without calling it a night. Have you ever said, “Wow, I can’t drink like I used to”? If so, we’re sorry to inform you that the glory days are over — you are officially a lightweight.

The other kind of lightweight? The kind that were born with it. No matter how old you are, how you’ve prepared for your long night out, or what you choose to drink, you find yourself wobbling after your first few.

If either of these sounds like you, it’s official: You’re a lightweight. A rule of thumb to follow if you’re a lightweight is to stay under five drinks. This way, you can avoid embarrassing your friends, calling it an early night, and that nasty hangover the next morning.

If you consistently can’t seem to handle your liquor, make it a point to hydrate and eat a big meal before a night of drinking. This will not only help you stay out longer, but it will also ensure that you’re not in pain the next day. Looking for other ways to avoid a hangover? Check out our list.

If you’ve decided you’re a lightweight, don’t feel discouraged. Look at it this way: You’ll save money on drinks, because it takes less alcohol to get you tipsy. Lightweights, rejoice!


A Week of Lightweight, Nutritious Backpacking Food

I am married to a serious backpacker. King-Man goes on several backpacking trips a year. He spends 1-2 weeks hiking the Grand Canyon every year (his favorite place on the planet), and in recent years has also hiked to the Mt. Everest Base Camp, Mt. Rainier, and numerous spots in Utah and Colorado. The more he hikes, the more he wants to. It's his thing.

He used to go most often on trips led by Sierra Club or REI where they provided most of the food. But now that he's more experienced, King-Man has been backpacking with a group of hiking friends that has formed through the years. That means he has to take his own food.

This is where I come in. King-Man doesn't cook at all. Since I'm a recipe developer, I thought it would be fun to figure out some tasty, homemade, nutritious food for him to take along on the trail. He had bought and assembled ready-made backpacking food in the past, but I decided to try creating some dried, lightweight recipes suitable for backpacking (or any type of camping, for that matter). That way I could make it as nutritious and tasty as possible. King-Man thinks my homemade instant meals are way better than the store bought stuff.

Requirements for backpacking food:

  • Lightweight & compact. King-Man backpacks for a minimum of 1 week at a time, and he has to carry everything he eats. The food needs to weigh as little as possible and be easy to carry.
  • No cooking, just boiled water. This means less to carry in the way of cooking gear. So, meals have to be an "instant" variety that requires nothing more than adding boiling water.
  • Nutritious. Backpacking is hard work and expends a lot of calories and nutrients. It's important for the food to be dense in nutrients and calories in order to refuel the body.
  • Safe to carry without refrigeration. For obvious reasons.
  • Fits in a bear barrel. This isn't always a requirement but last summer when King-Man was backpacking for a week in Colorado, he was in bear country. So, the food he took along had to be very compact so he could pack it safely inside a bear barrel. It was a challenge, but we did it!

Hiking into Ptarmigan Creek in Rocky Mountain National Park. (photo shared by King-Man's hiking buddy, Mel)

7 days of recipes and organization tips. In this post, I'll explain how I assembled food for a week of backpacking including breakfast, lunch, dinner, and snacks. You may prefer to purchase all of your food rather than make your own instant meals. Either way, I'll show you how to organize and pack it in a bear barrel so there is easy access to each day's food.


A Week of Lightweight, Nutritious Backpacking Food

I am married to a serious backpacker. King-Man goes on several backpacking trips a year. He spends 1-2 weeks hiking the Grand Canyon every year (his favorite place on the planet), and in recent years has also hiked to the Mt. Everest Base Camp, Mt. Rainier, and numerous spots in Utah and Colorado. The more he hikes, the more he wants to. It's his thing.

He used to go most often on trips led by Sierra Club or REI where they provided most of the food. But now that he's more experienced, King-Man has been backpacking with a group of hiking friends that has formed through the years. That means he has to take his own food.

This is where I come in. King-Man doesn't cook at all. Since I'm a recipe developer, I thought it would be fun to figure out some tasty, homemade, nutritious food for him to take along on the trail. He had bought and assembled ready-made backpacking food in the past, but I decided to try creating some dried, lightweight recipes suitable for backpacking (or any type of camping, for that matter). That way I could make it as nutritious and tasty as possible. King-Man thinks my homemade instant meals are way better than the store bought stuff.

Requirements for backpacking food:

  • Lightweight & compact. King-Man backpacks for a minimum of 1 week at a time, and he has to carry everything he eats. The food needs to weigh as little as possible and be easy to carry.
  • No cooking, just boiled water. This means less to carry in the way of cooking gear. So, meals have to be an "instant" variety that requires nothing more than adding boiling water.
  • Nutritious. Backpacking is hard work and expends a lot of calories and nutrients. It's important for the food to be dense in nutrients and calories in order to refuel the body.
  • Safe to carry without refrigeration. For obvious reasons.
  • Fits in a bear barrel. This isn't always a requirement but last summer when King-Man was backpacking for a week in Colorado, he was in bear country. So, the food he took along had to be very compact so he could pack it safely inside a bear barrel. It was a challenge, but we did it!

Hiking into Ptarmigan Creek in Rocky Mountain National Park. (photo shared by King-Man's hiking buddy, Mel)

7 days of recipes and organization tips. In this post, I'll explain how I assembled food for a week of backpacking including breakfast, lunch, dinner, and snacks. You may prefer to purchase all of your food rather than make your own instant meals. Either way, I'll show you how to organize and pack it in a bear barrel so there is easy access to each day's food.


A Week of Lightweight, Nutritious Backpacking Food

I am married to a serious backpacker. King-Man goes on several backpacking trips a year. He spends 1-2 weeks hiking the Grand Canyon every year (his favorite place on the planet), and in recent years has also hiked to the Mt. Everest Base Camp, Mt. Rainier, and numerous spots in Utah and Colorado. The more he hikes, the more he wants to. It's his thing.

He used to go most often on trips led by Sierra Club or REI where they provided most of the food. But now that he's more experienced, King-Man has been backpacking with a group of hiking friends that has formed through the years. That means he has to take his own food.

This is where I come in. King-Man doesn't cook at all. Since I'm a recipe developer, I thought it would be fun to figure out some tasty, homemade, nutritious food for him to take along on the trail. He had bought and assembled ready-made backpacking food in the past, but I decided to try creating some dried, lightweight recipes suitable for backpacking (or any type of camping, for that matter). That way I could make it as nutritious and tasty as possible. King-Man thinks my homemade instant meals are way better than the store bought stuff.

Requirements for backpacking food:

  • Lightweight & compact. King-Man backpacks for a minimum of 1 week at a time, and he has to carry everything he eats. The food needs to weigh as little as possible and be easy to carry.
  • No cooking, just boiled water. This means less to carry in the way of cooking gear. So, meals have to be an "instant" variety that requires nothing more than adding boiling water.
  • Nutritious. Backpacking is hard work and expends a lot of calories and nutrients. It's important for the food to be dense in nutrients and calories in order to refuel the body.
  • Safe to carry without refrigeration. For obvious reasons.
  • Fits in a bear barrel. This isn't always a requirement but last summer when King-Man was backpacking for a week in Colorado, he was in bear country. So, the food he took along had to be very compact so he could pack it safely inside a bear barrel. It was a challenge, but we did it!

Hiking into Ptarmigan Creek in Rocky Mountain National Park. (photo shared by King-Man's hiking buddy, Mel)

7 days of recipes and organization tips. In this post, I'll explain how I assembled food for a week of backpacking including breakfast, lunch, dinner, and snacks. You may prefer to purchase all of your food rather than make your own instant meals. Either way, I'll show you how to organize and pack it in a bear barrel so there is easy access to each day's food.


A Week of Lightweight, Nutritious Backpacking Food

I am married to a serious backpacker. King-Man goes on several backpacking trips a year. He spends 1-2 weeks hiking the Grand Canyon every year (his favorite place on the planet), and in recent years has also hiked to the Mt. Everest Base Camp, Mt. Rainier, and numerous spots in Utah and Colorado. The more he hikes, the more he wants to. It's his thing.

He used to go most often on trips led by Sierra Club or REI where they provided most of the food. But now that he's more experienced, King-Man has been backpacking with a group of hiking friends that has formed through the years. That means he has to take his own food.

This is where I come in. King-Man doesn't cook at all. Since I'm a recipe developer, I thought it would be fun to figure out some tasty, homemade, nutritious food for him to take along on the trail. He had bought and assembled ready-made backpacking food in the past, but I decided to try creating some dried, lightweight recipes suitable for backpacking (or any type of camping, for that matter). That way I could make it as nutritious and tasty as possible. King-Man thinks my homemade instant meals are way better than the store bought stuff.

Requirements for backpacking food:

  • Lightweight & compact. King-Man backpacks for a minimum of 1 week at a time, and he has to carry everything he eats. The food needs to weigh as little as possible and be easy to carry.
  • No cooking, just boiled water. This means less to carry in the way of cooking gear. So, meals have to be an "instant" variety that requires nothing more than adding boiling water.
  • Nutritious. Backpacking is hard work and expends a lot of calories and nutrients. It's important for the food to be dense in nutrients and calories in order to refuel the body.
  • Safe to carry without refrigeration. For obvious reasons.
  • Fits in a bear barrel. This isn't always a requirement but last summer when King-Man was backpacking for a week in Colorado, he was in bear country. So, the food he took along had to be very compact so he could pack it safely inside a bear barrel. It was a challenge, but we did it!

Hiking into Ptarmigan Creek in Rocky Mountain National Park. (photo shared by King-Man's hiking buddy, Mel)

7 days of recipes and organization tips. In this post, I'll explain how I assembled food for a week of backpacking including breakfast, lunch, dinner, and snacks. You may prefer to purchase all of your food rather than make your own instant meals. Either way, I'll show you how to organize and pack it in a bear barrel so there is easy access to each day's food.


A Week of Lightweight, Nutritious Backpacking Food

I am married to a serious backpacker. King-Man goes on several backpacking trips a year. He spends 1-2 weeks hiking the Grand Canyon every year (his favorite place on the planet), and in recent years has also hiked to the Mt. Everest Base Camp, Mt. Rainier, and numerous spots in Utah and Colorado. The more he hikes, the more he wants to. It's his thing.

He used to go most often on trips led by Sierra Club or REI where they provided most of the food. But now that he's more experienced, King-Man has been backpacking with a group of hiking friends that has formed through the years. That means he has to take his own food.

This is where I come in. King-Man doesn't cook at all. Since I'm a recipe developer, I thought it would be fun to figure out some tasty, homemade, nutritious food for him to take along on the trail. He had bought and assembled ready-made backpacking food in the past, but I decided to try creating some dried, lightweight recipes suitable for backpacking (or any type of camping, for that matter). That way I could make it as nutritious and tasty as possible. King-Man thinks my homemade instant meals are way better than the store bought stuff.

Requirements for backpacking food:

  • Lightweight & compact. King-Man backpacks for a minimum of 1 week at a time, and he has to carry everything he eats. The food needs to weigh as little as possible and be easy to carry.
  • No cooking, just boiled water. This means less to carry in the way of cooking gear. So, meals have to be an "instant" variety that requires nothing more than adding boiling water.
  • Nutritious. Backpacking is hard work and expends a lot of calories and nutrients. It's important for the food to be dense in nutrients and calories in order to refuel the body.
  • Safe to carry without refrigeration. For obvious reasons.
  • Fits in a bear barrel. This isn't always a requirement but last summer when King-Man was backpacking for a week in Colorado, he was in bear country. So, the food he took along had to be very compact so he could pack it safely inside a bear barrel. It was a challenge, but we did it!

Hiking into Ptarmigan Creek in Rocky Mountain National Park. (photo shared by King-Man's hiking buddy, Mel)

7 days of recipes and organization tips. In this post, I'll explain how I assembled food for a week of backpacking including breakfast, lunch, dinner, and snacks. You may prefer to purchase all of your food rather than make your own instant meals. Either way, I'll show you how to organize and pack it in a bear barrel so there is easy access to each day's food.


A Week of Lightweight, Nutritious Backpacking Food

I am married to a serious backpacker. King-Man goes on several backpacking trips a year. He spends 1-2 weeks hiking the Grand Canyon every year (his favorite place on the planet), and in recent years has also hiked to the Mt. Everest Base Camp, Mt. Rainier, and numerous spots in Utah and Colorado. The more he hikes, the more he wants to. It's his thing.

He used to go most often on trips led by Sierra Club or REI where they provided most of the food. But now that he's more experienced, King-Man has been backpacking with a group of hiking friends that has formed through the years. That means he has to take his own food.

This is where I come in. King-Man doesn't cook at all. Since I'm a recipe developer, I thought it would be fun to figure out some tasty, homemade, nutritious food for him to take along on the trail. He had bought and assembled ready-made backpacking food in the past, but I decided to try creating some dried, lightweight recipes suitable for backpacking (or any type of camping, for that matter). That way I could make it as nutritious and tasty as possible. King-Man thinks my homemade instant meals are way better than the store bought stuff.

Requirements for backpacking food:

  • Lightweight & compact. King-Man backpacks for a minimum of 1 week at a time, and he has to carry everything he eats. The food needs to weigh as little as possible and be easy to carry.
  • No cooking, just boiled water. This means less to carry in the way of cooking gear. So, meals have to be an "instant" variety that requires nothing more than adding boiling water.
  • Nutritious. Backpacking is hard work and expends a lot of calories and nutrients. It's important for the food to be dense in nutrients and calories in order to refuel the body.
  • Safe to carry without refrigeration. For obvious reasons.
  • Fits in a bear barrel. This isn't always a requirement but last summer when King-Man was backpacking for a week in Colorado, he was in bear country. So, the food he took along had to be very compact so he could pack it safely inside a bear barrel. It was a challenge, but we did it!

Hiking into Ptarmigan Creek in Rocky Mountain National Park. (photo shared by King-Man's hiking buddy, Mel)

7 days of recipes and organization tips. In this post, I'll explain how I assembled food for a week of backpacking including breakfast, lunch, dinner, and snacks. You may prefer to purchase all of your food rather than make your own instant meals. Either way, I'll show you how to organize and pack it in a bear barrel so there is easy access to each day's food.


A Week of Lightweight, Nutritious Backpacking Food

I am married to a serious backpacker. King-Man goes on several backpacking trips a year. He spends 1-2 weeks hiking the Grand Canyon every year (his favorite place on the planet), and in recent years has also hiked to the Mt. Everest Base Camp, Mt. Rainier, and numerous spots in Utah and Colorado. The more he hikes, the more he wants to. It's his thing.

He used to go most often on trips led by Sierra Club or REI where they provided most of the food. But now that he's more experienced, King-Man has been backpacking with a group of hiking friends that has formed through the years. That means he has to take his own food.

This is where I come in. King-Man doesn't cook at all. Since I'm a recipe developer, I thought it would be fun to figure out some tasty, homemade, nutritious food for him to take along on the trail. He had bought and assembled ready-made backpacking food in the past, but I decided to try creating some dried, lightweight recipes suitable for backpacking (or any type of camping, for that matter). That way I could make it as nutritious and tasty as possible. King-Man thinks my homemade instant meals are way better than the store bought stuff.

Requirements for backpacking food:

  • Lightweight & compact. King-Man backpacks for a minimum of 1 week at a time, and he has to carry everything he eats. The food needs to weigh as little as possible and be easy to carry.
  • No cooking, just boiled water. This means less to carry in the way of cooking gear. So, meals have to be an "instant" variety that requires nothing more than adding boiling water.
  • Nutritious. Backpacking is hard work and expends a lot of calories and nutrients. It's important for the food to be dense in nutrients and calories in order to refuel the body.
  • Safe to carry without refrigeration. For obvious reasons.
  • Fits in a bear barrel. This isn't always a requirement but last summer when King-Man was backpacking for a week in Colorado, he was in bear country. So, the food he took along had to be very compact so he could pack it safely inside a bear barrel. It was a challenge, but we did it!

Hiking into Ptarmigan Creek in Rocky Mountain National Park. (photo shared by King-Man's hiking buddy, Mel)

7 days of recipes and organization tips. In this post, I'll explain how I assembled food for a week of backpacking including breakfast, lunch, dinner, and snacks. You may prefer to purchase all of your food rather than make your own instant meals. Either way, I'll show you how to organize and pack it in a bear barrel so there is easy access to each day's food.


A Week of Lightweight, Nutritious Backpacking Food

I am married to a serious backpacker. King-Man goes on several backpacking trips a year. He spends 1-2 weeks hiking the Grand Canyon every year (his favorite place on the planet), and in recent years has also hiked to the Mt. Everest Base Camp, Mt. Rainier, and numerous spots in Utah and Colorado. The more he hikes, the more he wants to. It's his thing.

He used to go most often on trips led by Sierra Club or REI where they provided most of the food. But now that he's more experienced, King-Man has been backpacking with a group of hiking friends that has formed through the years. That means he has to take his own food.

This is where I come in. King-Man doesn't cook at all. Since I'm a recipe developer, I thought it would be fun to figure out some tasty, homemade, nutritious food for him to take along on the trail. He had bought and assembled ready-made backpacking food in the past, but I decided to try creating some dried, lightweight recipes suitable for backpacking (or any type of camping, for that matter). That way I could make it as nutritious and tasty as possible. King-Man thinks my homemade instant meals are way better than the store bought stuff.

Requirements for backpacking food:

  • Lightweight & compact. King-Man backpacks for a minimum of 1 week at a time, and he has to carry everything he eats. The food needs to weigh as little as possible and be easy to carry.
  • No cooking, just boiled water. This means less to carry in the way of cooking gear. So, meals have to be an "instant" variety that requires nothing more than adding boiling water.
  • Nutritious. Backpacking is hard work and expends a lot of calories and nutrients. It's important for the food to be dense in nutrients and calories in order to refuel the body.
  • Safe to carry without refrigeration. For obvious reasons.
  • Fits in a bear barrel. This isn't always a requirement but last summer when King-Man was backpacking for a week in Colorado, he was in bear country. So, the food he took along had to be very compact so he could pack it safely inside a bear barrel. It was a challenge, but we did it!

Hiking into Ptarmigan Creek in Rocky Mountain National Park. (photo shared by King-Man's hiking buddy, Mel)

7 days of recipes and organization tips. In this post, I'll explain how I assembled food for a week of backpacking including breakfast, lunch, dinner, and snacks. You may prefer to purchase all of your food rather than make your own instant meals. Either way, I'll show you how to organize and pack it in a bear barrel so there is easy access to each day's food.


A Week of Lightweight, Nutritious Backpacking Food

I am married to a serious backpacker. King-Man goes on several backpacking trips a year. He spends 1-2 weeks hiking the Grand Canyon every year (his favorite place on the planet), and in recent years has also hiked to the Mt. Everest Base Camp, Mt. Rainier, and numerous spots in Utah and Colorado. The more he hikes, the more he wants to. It's his thing.

He used to go most often on trips led by Sierra Club or REI where they provided most of the food. But now that he's more experienced, King-Man has been backpacking with a group of hiking friends that has formed through the years. That means he has to take his own food.

This is where I come in. King-Man doesn't cook at all. Since I'm a recipe developer, I thought it would be fun to figure out some tasty, homemade, nutritious food for him to take along on the trail. He had bought and assembled ready-made backpacking food in the past, but I decided to try creating some dried, lightweight recipes suitable for backpacking (or any type of camping, for that matter). That way I could make it as nutritious and tasty as possible. King-Man thinks my homemade instant meals are way better than the store bought stuff.

Requirements for backpacking food:

  • Lightweight & compact. King-Man backpacks for a minimum of 1 week at a time, and he has to carry everything he eats. The food needs to weigh as little as possible and be easy to carry.
  • No cooking, just boiled water. This means less to carry in the way of cooking gear. So, meals have to be an "instant" variety that requires nothing more than adding boiling water.
  • Nutritious. Backpacking is hard work and expends a lot of calories and nutrients. It's important for the food to be dense in nutrients and calories in order to refuel the body.
  • Safe to carry without refrigeration. For obvious reasons.
  • Fits in a bear barrel. This isn't always a requirement but last summer when King-Man was backpacking for a week in Colorado, he was in bear country. So, the food he took along had to be very compact so he could pack it safely inside a bear barrel. It was a challenge, but we did it!

Hiking into Ptarmigan Creek in Rocky Mountain National Park. (photo shared by King-Man's hiking buddy, Mel)

7 days of recipes and organization tips. In this post, I'll explain how I assembled food for a week of backpacking including breakfast, lunch, dinner, and snacks. You may prefer to purchase all of your food rather than make your own instant meals. Either way, I'll show you how to organize and pack it in a bear barrel so there is easy access to each day's food.


A Week of Lightweight, Nutritious Backpacking Food

I am married to a serious backpacker. King-Man goes on several backpacking trips a year. He spends 1-2 weeks hiking the Grand Canyon every year (his favorite place on the planet), and in recent years has also hiked to the Mt. Everest Base Camp, Mt. Rainier, and numerous spots in Utah and Colorado. The more he hikes, the more he wants to. It's his thing.

He used to go most often on trips led by Sierra Club or REI where they provided most of the food. But now that he's more experienced, King-Man has been backpacking with a group of hiking friends that has formed through the years. That means he has to take his own food.

This is where I come in. King-Man doesn't cook at all. Since I'm a recipe developer, I thought it would be fun to figure out some tasty, homemade, nutritious food for him to take along on the trail. He had bought and assembled ready-made backpacking food in the past, but I decided to try creating some dried, lightweight recipes suitable for backpacking (or any type of camping, for that matter). That way I could make it as nutritious and tasty as possible. King-Man thinks my homemade instant meals are way better than the store bought stuff.

Requirements for backpacking food:

  • Lightweight & compact. King-Man backpacks for a minimum of 1 week at a time, and he has to carry everything he eats. The food needs to weigh as little as possible and be easy to carry.
  • No cooking, just boiled water. This means less to carry in the way of cooking gear. So, meals have to be an "instant" variety that requires nothing more than adding boiling water.
  • Nutritious. Backpacking is hard work and expends a lot of calories and nutrients. It's important for the food to be dense in nutrients and calories in order to refuel the body.
  • Safe to carry without refrigeration. For obvious reasons.
  • Fits in a bear barrel. This isn't always a requirement but last summer when King-Man was backpacking for a week in Colorado, he was in bear country. So, the food he took along had to be very compact so he could pack it safely inside a bear barrel. It was a challenge, but we did it!

Hiking into Ptarmigan Creek in Rocky Mountain National Park. (photo shared by King-Man's hiking buddy, Mel)

7 days of recipes and organization tips. In this post, I'll explain how I assembled food for a week of backpacking including breakfast, lunch, dinner, and snacks. You may prefer to purchase all of your food rather than make your own instant meals. Either way, I'll show you how to organize and pack it in a bear barrel so there is easy access to each day's food.


Watch the video: SPIDER-MAN: NO WAY HOME 2021 Teaser Trailer 2. Marvel Studios (January 2022).