Traditional recipes

Liquid Fruitcake Slideshow

Liquid Fruitcake Slideshow


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Maryse Chevriere

Take the molasses that you would have put in your fruitcake batter, and use it instead in this recipe for Vanderbilt's Hudson Buck. The New York restaurant sources the apple cider molasses used in this cocktail from a farmer upstate.

Hudson Buck

Maryse Chevriere

Take the molasses that you would have put in your fruitcake batter, and use it instead in this recipe for Vanderbilt's Hudson Buck. The New York restaurant sources the apple cider molasses used in this cocktail from a farmer upstate.

The Situation

Maryse Chevriere

Raisins are one of the staple ingredients of fruitcake. Enjoy them even more in this cocktail from New York's Summit Bar, which cleverly features the golden variety as a garnish.

Glögg

You can also pay homage to fruitcake's raisins with the classic Scandinavian mulled wine, Glögg. In addition to raisins, this recipe, from Aquavit's Executive Chef Marcus Jernmark, also infuses other fruitcake flavors like citrus peel, cinnamon, brown sugar, and nutmeg.

Piccola Noce

Instead of walnuts, think walnut liqueur. Lavo's Piccola Noce (literally, "little walnut") captures the flavors of the holiday with this nutty spirit.

Blood Orange, Ginger Beer, & Tequila Cocktail

To represnt the candied citrus peel often found in fruitcakes, why not mix a blood orange cocktail, like this one, from Food Porn Daily?

Lola in Love

In a fruitcake, dried cranberries are nice. In a cocktail, fresh and puréed cranberries are even better. Want proof? Try Ofrenda's Lola in Love cocktail.

The Gilligan

We'll take pineapple juice in fruity beach cocktail, like The Gilligan, over fruitcake's candied pineapple any day.

Sam's Serious Eggnog

Allison Beck

Try nutmeg in another Christmas classic: Eggnog. This recipe, from Waterfront Ale House in New York, gets two teaspoons freshly grated on top. And, like fruitcake, it also calls for dark rum and cinammon.

Farmer's Daughter

Spices, like cinnamon, are key to fruitcake. It's also an essential ingredient in this hot cocktail from Brooklyn's Five Leaves, which uses a whole cinnamon stick in it.

Hot Buttered Rum

Butter, everyone's favorite ingredient and a baking must-have, isn't enough to inspire everyone's interest in fruitcake. But it does find a happy home in Hot Buttered Rum, like this one from Café Nell in Portland.

Mexican Hot Chocolate

Brown sugar makes everything better, except maybe fruitcake. It's much more enjoyable in this recipe for Mexican Hot Chocolate from cookbook author Judith Choate.

Martha Washington Rum Punch

Fruitcake actually has dark rum in it, and still people dislike it. We say, leave the fruitcake, take the rum...and pour it into a punchbowl to make Martha Washington's Rum Punch.


When Your Baptist Mama Makes A Tipsy Fruitcake

She's torn between her reverence for a family recipe and her aversion to strong drink.

The holiday season presents a prickly moral dilemma for my mother. Her signature dessert is a meticulously faithful execution of Great-Aunt Margaret&aposs Christmas fruitcake recipe, which must be soaked in peach brandy. But Mama&aposs a Southern Baptist, so drinkin&aposs a sin. Nary a drop of alcohol is ever allowed in her home (though she has been known to allow herself a sip of champagne punch in MY home, provided it was made from a Southern Living recipe and therefore sin-free).

Why not simply forego the brandy? Because Aunt Margaret decreed that the fruitcake must be soaked, and soaked it shall be. Even though this venerable family cook passed away many years ago, we dare not tinker with her time-honored dessert. Somehow, Aunt Margaret would know. And she would NOT be pleased.

At first, Mama had my cousin&aposs husband purchase the spirits for her, insisting that he deliver them to her back door, just in case anyone from the church might drive by during the drop. But then her bag man up and moved down to the coast, leaving Mama without a supplier. For a while, Daddy had to pinch hit, but that was never an ideal solution—guilt by association and all that.

Finally, I remedied her situation by getting married. (I&aposm not saying I wed my beloved because Mama needed a brandy runner, but the marriage did work in her favor.) And y&aposall, this is some more recipe. My uncle swears (swunnies?) that he can get high off a single slice of brandy-soaked fruitcake. It&aposs not that strong. But it&aposs definitely soaked, so maybe you could get stewed if you have one (slice) too many.

Though the brandy delivery issue is resolved, yet another fruitcake controversy is brewing. Mama noticed a suspicious drop in the brandy level from one Christmas to the next and accused Daddy of sipping. His defense: "That&aposs just normal evaporation."

WATCH: The Most Googled Christmas Recipe In The South

You can rest assured that it&aposs not "tweezer food" or anything with wheatgrass in the ingredient list. We&aposd be willing to bet sugar&aposs involved. But that&aposs just an educated guess.


When Your Baptist Mama Makes A Tipsy Fruitcake

She's torn between her reverence for a family recipe and her aversion to strong drink.

The holiday season presents a prickly moral dilemma for my mother. Her signature dessert is a meticulously faithful execution of Great-Aunt Margaret&aposs Christmas fruitcake recipe, which must be soaked in peach brandy. But Mama&aposs a Southern Baptist, so drinkin&aposs a sin. Nary a drop of alcohol is ever allowed in her home (though she has been known to allow herself a sip of champagne punch in MY home, provided it was made from a Southern Living recipe and therefore sin-free).

Why not simply forego the brandy? Because Aunt Margaret decreed that the fruitcake must be soaked, and soaked it shall be. Even though this venerable family cook passed away many years ago, we dare not tinker with her time-honored dessert. Somehow, Aunt Margaret would know. And she would NOT be pleased.

At first, Mama had my cousin&aposs husband purchase the spirits for her, insisting that he deliver them to her back door, just in case anyone from the church might drive by during the drop. But then her bag man up and moved down to the coast, leaving Mama without a supplier. For a while, Daddy had to pinch hit, but that was never an ideal solution—guilt by association and all that.

Finally, I remedied her situation by getting married. (I&aposm not saying I wed my beloved because Mama needed a brandy runner, but the marriage did work in her favor.) And y&aposall, this is some more recipe. My uncle swears (swunnies?) that he can get high off a single slice of brandy-soaked fruitcake. It&aposs not that strong. But it&aposs definitely soaked, so maybe you could get stewed if you have one (slice) too many.

Though the brandy delivery issue is resolved, yet another fruitcake controversy is brewing. Mama noticed a suspicious drop in the brandy level from one Christmas to the next and accused Daddy of sipping. His defense: "That&aposs just normal evaporation."

WATCH: The Most Googled Christmas Recipe In The South

You can rest assured that it&aposs not "tweezer food" or anything with wheatgrass in the ingredient list. We&aposd be willing to bet sugar&aposs involved. But that&aposs just an educated guess.


When Your Baptist Mama Makes A Tipsy Fruitcake

She's torn between her reverence for a family recipe and her aversion to strong drink.

The holiday season presents a prickly moral dilemma for my mother. Her signature dessert is a meticulously faithful execution of Great-Aunt Margaret&aposs Christmas fruitcake recipe, which must be soaked in peach brandy. But Mama&aposs a Southern Baptist, so drinkin&aposs a sin. Nary a drop of alcohol is ever allowed in her home (though she has been known to allow herself a sip of champagne punch in MY home, provided it was made from a Southern Living recipe and therefore sin-free).

Why not simply forego the brandy? Because Aunt Margaret decreed that the fruitcake must be soaked, and soaked it shall be. Even though this venerable family cook passed away many years ago, we dare not tinker with her time-honored dessert. Somehow, Aunt Margaret would know. And she would NOT be pleased.

At first, Mama had my cousin&aposs husband purchase the spirits for her, insisting that he deliver them to her back door, just in case anyone from the church might drive by during the drop. But then her bag man up and moved down to the coast, leaving Mama without a supplier. For a while, Daddy had to pinch hit, but that was never an ideal solution—guilt by association and all that.

Finally, I remedied her situation by getting married. (I&aposm not saying I wed my beloved because Mama needed a brandy runner, but the marriage did work in her favor.) And y&aposall, this is some more recipe. My uncle swears (swunnies?) that he can get high off a single slice of brandy-soaked fruitcake. It&aposs not that strong. But it&aposs definitely soaked, so maybe you could get stewed if you have one (slice) too many.

Though the brandy delivery issue is resolved, yet another fruitcake controversy is brewing. Mama noticed a suspicious drop in the brandy level from one Christmas to the next and accused Daddy of sipping. His defense: "That&aposs just normal evaporation."

WATCH: The Most Googled Christmas Recipe In The South

You can rest assured that it&aposs not "tweezer food" or anything with wheatgrass in the ingredient list. We&aposd be willing to bet sugar&aposs involved. But that&aposs just an educated guess.


When Your Baptist Mama Makes A Tipsy Fruitcake

She's torn between her reverence for a family recipe and her aversion to strong drink.

The holiday season presents a prickly moral dilemma for my mother. Her signature dessert is a meticulously faithful execution of Great-Aunt Margaret&aposs Christmas fruitcake recipe, which must be soaked in peach brandy. But Mama&aposs a Southern Baptist, so drinkin&aposs a sin. Nary a drop of alcohol is ever allowed in her home (though she has been known to allow herself a sip of champagne punch in MY home, provided it was made from a Southern Living recipe and therefore sin-free).

Why not simply forego the brandy? Because Aunt Margaret decreed that the fruitcake must be soaked, and soaked it shall be. Even though this venerable family cook passed away many years ago, we dare not tinker with her time-honored dessert. Somehow, Aunt Margaret would know. And she would NOT be pleased.

At first, Mama had my cousin&aposs husband purchase the spirits for her, insisting that he deliver them to her back door, just in case anyone from the church might drive by during the drop. But then her bag man up and moved down to the coast, leaving Mama without a supplier. For a while, Daddy had to pinch hit, but that was never an ideal solution—guilt by association and all that.

Finally, I remedied her situation by getting married. (I&aposm not saying I wed my beloved because Mama needed a brandy runner, but the marriage did work in her favor.) And y&aposall, this is some more recipe. My uncle swears (swunnies?) that he can get high off a single slice of brandy-soaked fruitcake. It&aposs not that strong. But it&aposs definitely soaked, so maybe you could get stewed if you have one (slice) too many.

Though the brandy delivery issue is resolved, yet another fruitcake controversy is brewing. Mama noticed a suspicious drop in the brandy level from one Christmas to the next and accused Daddy of sipping. His defense: "That&aposs just normal evaporation."

WATCH: The Most Googled Christmas Recipe In The South

You can rest assured that it&aposs not "tweezer food" or anything with wheatgrass in the ingredient list. We&aposd be willing to bet sugar&aposs involved. But that&aposs just an educated guess.


When Your Baptist Mama Makes A Tipsy Fruitcake

She's torn between her reverence for a family recipe and her aversion to strong drink.

The holiday season presents a prickly moral dilemma for my mother. Her signature dessert is a meticulously faithful execution of Great-Aunt Margaret&aposs Christmas fruitcake recipe, which must be soaked in peach brandy. But Mama&aposs a Southern Baptist, so drinkin&aposs a sin. Nary a drop of alcohol is ever allowed in her home (though she has been known to allow herself a sip of champagne punch in MY home, provided it was made from a Southern Living recipe and therefore sin-free).

Why not simply forego the brandy? Because Aunt Margaret decreed that the fruitcake must be soaked, and soaked it shall be. Even though this venerable family cook passed away many years ago, we dare not tinker with her time-honored dessert. Somehow, Aunt Margaret would know. And she would NOT be pleased.

At first, Mama had my cousin&aposs husband purchase the spirits for her, insisting that he deliver them to her back door, just in case anyone from the church might drive by during the drop. But then her bag man up and moved down to the coast, leaving Mama without a supplier. For a while, Daddy had to pinch hit, but that was never an ideal solution—guilt by association and all that.

Finally, I remedied her situation by getting married. (I&aposm not saying I wed my beloved because Mama needed a brandy runner, but the marriage did work in her favor.) And y&aposall, this is some more recipe. My uncle swears (swunnies?) that he can get high off a single slice of brandy-soaked fruitcake. It&aposs not that strong. But it&aposs definitely soaked, so maybe you could get stewed if you have one (slice) too many.

Though the brandy delivery issue is resolved, yet another fruitcake controversy is brewing. Mama noticed a suspicious drop in the brandy level from one Christmas to the next and accused Daddy of sipping. His defense: "That&aposs just normal evaporation."

WATCH: The Most Googled Christmas Recipe In The South

You can rest assured that it&aposs not "tweezer food" or anything with wheatgrass in the ingredient list. We&aposd be willing to bet sugar&aposs involved. But that&aposs just an educated guess.


When Your Baptist Mama Makes A Tipsy Fruitcake

She's torn between her reverence for a family recipe and her aversion to strong drink.

The holiday season presents a prickly moral dilemma for my mother. Her signature dessert is a meticulously faithful execution of Great-Aunt Margaret&aposs Christmas fruitcake recipe, which must be soaked in peach brandy. But Mama&aposs a Southern Baptist, so drinkin&aposs a sin. Nary a drop of alcohol is ever allowed in her home (though she has been known to allow herself a sip of champagne punch in MY home, provided it was made from a Southern Living recipe and therefore sin-free).

Why not simply forego the brandy? Because Aunt Margaret decreed that the fruitcake must be soaked, and soaked it shall be. Even though this venerable family cook passed away many years ago, we dare not tinker with her time-honored dessert. Somehow, Aunt Margaret would know. And she would NOT be pleased.

At first, Mama had my cousin&aposs husband purchase the spirits for her, insisting that he deliver them to her back door, just in case anyone from the church might drive by during the drop. But then her bag man up and moved down to the coast, leaving Mama without a supplier. For a while, Daddy had to pinch hit, but that was never an ideal solution—guilt by association and all that.

Finally, I remedied her situation by getting married. (I&aposm not saying I wed my beloved because Mama needed a brandy runner, but the marriage did work in her favor.) And y&aposall, this is some more recipe. My uncle swears (swunnies?) that he can get high off a single slice of brandy-soaked fruitcake. It&aposs not that strong. But it&aposs definitely soaked, so maybe you could get stewed if you have one (slice) too many.

Though the brandy delivery issue is resolved, yet another fruitcake controversy is brewing. Mama noticed a suspicious drop in the brandy level from one Christmas to the next and accused Daddy of sipping. His defense: "That&aposs just normal evaporation."

WATCH: The Most Googled Christmas Recipe In The South

You can rest assured that it&aposs not "tweezer food" or anything with wheatgrass in the ingredient list. We&aposd be willing to bet sugar&aposs involved. But that&aposs just an educated guess.


When Your Baptist Mama Makes A Tipsy Fruitcake

She's torn between her reverence for a family recipe and her aversion to strong drink.

The holiday season presents a prickly moral dilemma for my mother. Her signature dessert is a meticulously faithful execution of Great-Aunt Margaret&aposs Christmas fruitcake recipe, which must be soaked in peach brandy. But Mama&aposs a Southern Baptist, so drinkin&aposs a sin. Nary a drop of alcohol is ever allowed in her home (though she has been known to allow herself a sip of champagne punch in MY home, provided it was made from a Southern Living recipe and therefore sin-free).

Why not simply forego the brandy? Because Aunt Margaret decreed that the fruitcake must be soaked, and soaked it shall be. Even though this venerable family cook passed away many years ago, we dare not tinker with her time-honored dessert. Somehow, Aunt Margaret would know. And she would NOT be pleased.

At first, Mama had my cousin&aposs husband purchase the spirits for her, insisting that he deliver them to her back door, just in case anyone from the church might drive by during the drop. But then her bag man up and moved down to the coast, leaving Mama without a supplier. For a while, Daddy had to pinch hit, but that was never an ideal solution—guilt by association and all that.

Finally, I remedied her situation by getting married. (I&aposm not saying I wed my beloved because Mama needed a brandy runner, but the marriage did work in her favor.) And y&aposall, this is some more recipe. My uncle swears (swunnies?) that he can get high off a single slice of brandy-soaked fruitcake. It&aposs not that strong. But it&aposs definitely soaked, so maybe you could get stewed if you have one (slice) too many.

Though the brandy delivery issue is resolved, yet another fruitcake controversy is brewing. Mama noticed a suspicious drop in the brandy level from one Christmas to the next and accused Daddy of sipping. His defense: "That&aposs just normal evaporation."

WATCH: The Most Googled Christmas Recipe In The South

You can rest assured that it&aposs not "tweezer food" or anything with wheatgrass in the ingredient list. We&aposd be willing to bet sugar&aposs involved. But that&aposs just an educated guess.


When Your Baptist Mama Makes A Tipsy Fruitcake

She's torn between her reverence for a family recipe and her aversion to strong drink.

The holiday season presents a prickly moral dilemma for my mother. Her signature dessert is a meticulously faithful execution of Great-Aunt Margaret&aposs Christmas fruitcake recipe, which must be soaked in peach brandy. But Mama&aposs a Southern Baptist, so drinkin&aposs a sin. Nary a drop of alcohol is ever allowed in her home (though she has been known to allow herself a sip of champagne punch in MY home, provided it was made from a Southern Living recipe and therefore sin-free).

Why not simply forego the brandy? Because Aunt Margaret decreed that the fruitcake must be soaked, and soaked it shall be. Even though this venerable family cook passed away many years ago, we dare not tinker with her time-honored dessert. Somehow, Aunt Margaret would know. And she would NOT be pleased.

At first, Mama had my cousin&aposs husband purchase the spirits for her, insisting that he deliver them to her back door, just in case anyone from the church might drive by during the drop. But then her bag man up and moved down to the coast, leaving Mama without a supplier. For a while, Daddy had to pinch hit, but that was never an ideal solution—guilt by association and all that.

Finally, I remedied her situation by getting married. (I&aposm not saying I wed my beloved because Mama needed a brandy runner, but the marriage did work in her favor.) And y&aposall, this is some more recipe. My uncle swears (swunnies?) that he can get high off a single slice of brandy-soaked fruitcake. It&aposs not that strong. But it&aposs definitely soaked, so maybe you could get stewed if you have one (slice) too many.

Though the brandy delivery issue is resolved, yet another fruitcake controversy is brewing. Mama noticed a suspicious drop in the brandy level from one Christmas to the next and accused Daddy of sipping. His defense: "That&aposs just normal evaporation."

WATCH: The Most Googled Christmas Recipe In The South

You can rest assured that it&aposs not "tweezer food" or anything with wheatgrass in the ingredient list. We&aposd be willing to bet sugar&aposs involved. But that&aposs just an educated guess.


When Your Baptist Mama Makes A Tipsy Fruitcake

She's torn between her reverence for a family recipe and her aversion to strong drink.

The holiday season presents a prickly moral dilemma for my mother. Her signature dessert is a meticulously faithful execution of Great-Aunt Margaret&aposs Christmas fruitcake recipe, which must be soaked in peach brandy. But Mama&aposs a Southern Baptist, so drinkin&aposs a sin. Nary a drop of alcohol is ever allowed in her home (though she has been known to allow herself a sip of champagne punch in MY home, provided it was made from a Southern Living recipe and therefore sin-free).

Why not simply forego the brandy? Because Aunt Margaret decreed that the fruitcake must be soaked, and soaked it shall be. Even though this venerable family cook passed away many years ago, we dare not tinker with her time-honored dessert. Somehow, Aunt Margaret would know. And she would NOT be pleased.

At first, Mama had my cousin&aposs husband purchase the spirits for her, insisting that he deliver them to her back door, just in case anyone from the church might drive by during the drop. But then her bag man up and moved down to the coast, leaving Mama without a supplier. For a while, Daddy had to pinch hit, but that was never an ideal solution—guilt by association and all that.

Finally, I remedied her situation by getting married. (I&aposm not saying I wed my beloved because Mama needed a brandy runner, but the marriage did work in her favor.) And y&aposall, this is some more recipe. My uncle swears (swunnies?) that he can get high off a single slice of brandy-soaked fruitcake. It&aposs not that strong. But it&aposs definitely soaked, so maybe you could get stewed if you have one (slice) too many.

Though the brandy delivery issue is resolved, yet another fruitcake controversy is brewing. Mama noticed a suspicious drop in the brandy level from one Christmas to the next and accused Daddy of sipping. His defense: "That&aposs just normal evaporation."

WATCH: The Most Googled Christmas Recipe In The South

You can rest assured that it&aposs not "tweezer food" or anything with wheatgrass in the ingredient list. We&aposd be willing to bet sugar&aposs involved. But that&aposs just an educated guess.


When Your Baptist Mama Makes A Tipsy Fruitcake

She's torn between her reverence for a family recipe and her aversion to strong drink.

The holiday season presents a prickly moral dilemma for my mother. Her signature dessert is a meticulously faithful execution of Great-Aunt Margaret&aposs Christmas fruitcake recipe, which must be soaked in peach brandy. But Mama&aposs a Southern Baptist, so drinkin&aposs a sin. Nary a drop of alcohol is ever allowed in her home (though she has been known to allow herself a sip of champagne punch in MY home, provided it was made from a Southern Living recipe and therefore sin-free).

Why not simply forego the brandy? Because Aunt Margaret decreed that the fruitcake must be soaked, and soaked it shall be. Even though this venerable family cook passed away many years ago, we dare not tinker with her time-honored dessert. Somehow, Aunt Margaret would know. And she would NOT be pleased.

At first, Mama had my cousin&aposs husband purchase the spirits for her, insisting that he deliver them to her back door, just in case anyone from the church might drive by during the drop. But then her bag man up and moved down to the coast, leaving Mama without a supplier. For a while, Daddy had to pinch hit, but that was never an ideal solution—guilt by association and all that.

Finally, I remedied her situation by getting married. (I&aposm not saying I wed my beloved because Mama needed a brandy runner, but the marriage did work in her favor.) And y&aposall, this is some more recipe. My uncle swears (swunnies?) that he can get high off a single slice of brandy-soaked fruitcake. It&aposs not that strong. But it&aposs definitely soaked, so maybe you could get stewed if you have one (slice) too many.

Though the brandy delivery issue is resolved, yet another fruitcake controversy is brewing. Mama noticed a suspicious drop in the brandy level from one Christmas to the next and accused Daddy of sipping. His defense: "That&aposs just normal evaporation."

WATCH: The Most Googled Christmas Recipe In The South

You can rest assured that it&aposs not "tweezer food" or anything with wheatgrass in the ingredient list. We&aposd be willing to bet sugar&aposs involved. But that&aposs just an educated guess.


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Comments:

  1. Aylmer

    The shame and the shame!

  2. Cartere

    This can be discussed endlessly.

  3. Stroud

    Better sand on your teeth than frost on eggs! Science, born at the junction of mathematics and cybernetics - kibenimatics Paid taxes, sleep well (inscription on the gravestone). When a man feels bad, he looks for a woman. When a man feels good, he looks for another one. Inadvertent conception

  4. Abhainn

    The correct answer



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