Traditional recipes

180,000 Deaths Worldwide Associated with Sugary Drinks

180,000 Deaths Worldwide Associated with Sugary Drinks


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

In the US, the study linked about 25,000 deaths to sugary drinks

Soda has been linked to 180,000 deaths worldwide.

We have even more reason to be chugging water instead of soda — a new study now estimates that the number of deaths worldwide associated with sugary drinks may be more than 180,000.

The newest research from Harvard, presented at a meeting at the American Heart Association, examined data from the World Health Organizaton's Global Burden of Disease study in 2010 as well as other sources of data. According to Forbes, the study looked at where sugary drinks were consumed, and by gender and age. Worldwide, in 2010, the number of deaths associated with sugary drinks and the diseases that come with them — diabetes, heart disease — was upward of 184,000.

Where the most deaths associated with sugary drinks occured was in Mexico, where about 318 per 1 million deaths were linked to sugary drinks. The study found that those most at risk in Mexico were adults under the age of 45. And Americans didn't fare so well, either — with about 25,000 deaths. The study authors push for more initiatives similar to the New York City (failed for now) soda ban and taxes on sugary drinks. But the American Beverage Association (ABA), in response to the study, argues that the newest stats are more "sensationalism than science." "It does not show that consuming sugar-sweetened beverages causes chronic diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease or cancer — the real causes of death among the studied subjects," said the ABA in a statement. "The researchers make a huge leap when they take beverage intake calculations from around the globe and allege that those beverages are the cause of deaths which the authors themselves acknowledge are due to chronic disease."


Sugary drinks linked to 180,000 deaths worldwide

(CNN) -- Sugar-sweetened beverages are linked to more than 180,000 obesity-related deaths worldwide each year, according to new research presented this week at an American Heart Association conference.

"This means about one in every 100 deaths from obesity-related diseases is caused by drinking sugary beverages," says study author Gitanjali Singh, a postdoctoral research fellow at the Harvard School of Public Health.

Among the world&aposs 35 largest countries, Mexico had the highest death rates from sugary drinks, and Bangladesh had the lowest, according to the study. The United States ranked third.

However, the American Beverage Association dismissed the research as "more about sensationalism than science."

When people drink too many beverages containing added sugar, such as soft drinks, fruit drinks, energy or sports beverages, they tend to put on weight. The study authors say these added pounds increase the risk of developing diabetes, cardiovascular disease and some cancers -- conditions often referred to as obesity-related diseases.

Researchers at Harvard wanted to find out how often people around the globe drank sugar-sweetened beverages and how that affected their risk of death. They looked at 114 national dietary surveys covering more than 60% of the world&aposs population. They also used evidence from studies published in medical journals that discussed sugary drinks and other dietary habits. Their data was included in the 2010 Global Burden of Disease Study, which looks at the health and mortality of populations across the world.

How did the Harvard scientists single out that sweet drinks were linked to weight gain and death? They spent several years gathering and combing through data. They looked at all kind of factors that can affect our weight such as TV watching, changes in physical activity levels, smoking and the consumption of all kinds of food and drink.

When the researchers controlled for these factors, they were able to determine what percentage of deaths from diabetes, heart disease and cancer were linked to sugary drinks.

"The investigators examined changes in sugar-sweetened beverage consumption and then its association with change in body fatness or BMI (body mass index), and subsequent deaths from cardiovascular disease, diabetes and cancer," says Rachel Johnson, professor of nutrition at the University of Vermont in Burlington, who was not involved in the study.

Scientists found that more people died from diabetes, heart disease and cancer in parts of the world where consumption of sugary drinks is high.

Of the nine world regions in 2010, Latin America and the Caribbean had the most diabetes deaths linked to sugary drinks with 38,000. East and Central Eurasia had the most cardiovascular deaths at 11,000.

In the United States, sugary drinks were linked to the deaths of 25,000 people from diabetes and other obesity-related diseases. As in many other countries, the death rates were highest in young adults under age 45, with one in 10 obesity-related deaths associated with sugary beverages.

"Almost three-quarters of the deaths caused by sugary drinks are in low and middle income countries," says study author Dr. Dariush Mozaffarian, co-director of the cardiovascular epidemiology program at the Harvard School of Public Health. "So this is not just a problem in wealthy nations."

The average consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages in Mexico, the country with the highest death rates among larger nations, was 24 ounces per day.

The American Beverage Association released this statement in response to the study:

"This abstract, which is neither peer-reviewed nor published, is more about sensationalism than science. In no way does it show that consuming sugar-sweetened beverages causes chronic diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease or cancer - the real causes of death among the studied subjects.

"The researchers make a huge leap when they illogically and wrongly take beverage intake calculations from around the globe and allege that those beverages are the cause of deaths which the authors themselves acknowledge are due to chronic disease."

The study authors and other experts disagree.

"We know having an elevated BMI is associated with an increase risk of heart disease, diabetes and some cancers," says Johnson. "The body does not seem to detect fullness as well when you drink sugary drinks. That is one explanation for why sugar-sweetened beverages are associated with obesity."

Recently the American Heart Association came out with a scientific statement about sugar intake and heart health because it says there is new evidence about the relationship between the two. The statement says some research has found a link between sugar consumption and cardiovascular disease, while other research has not found a direct link.

The AHA says that the best way to maintain a healthy weight and to decrease the risk of heart disease is to eat a healthy diet and to limit added sugar to no more than 100 calories a day for women and 150 for men.

Soft drinks and other sugar-sweetened beverages are the main source of added sugars in the American diet, according to the statement. One 12-ounce regular soda contains the equivalent of 10 teaspoons of sugar and has about 140 calories.


Sugary Drinks Linked to Over 180,000 Deaths Worldwide

Half of the U.S. population over the age of 2 consumes sugary drinks on a daily basis, and this figure does not even include 100 percent fruit juices, flavored milk or sweetened teas, all of which are sugary too, which means the figure is actually even higher.

Many people mistakenly believe that as long as you are drinking fruit juice, it's healthy even though it's sweet, but this is a dangerous misconception that is fueling the rising rates of weight gain, obesity, fatty liver disease, high blood pressure and Type 2 diabetes in the United States and other developed nations.

It's important to realize sugary drinks, soda and even fresh-squeezed fruit juice contain fructose, which has been identified as one of the primary culprits in the meteoric rise of obesity and related health problems -- in large part due to its ability to turn on your "fat switch."

Sugary Drinks Linked to 180,000 Deaths Annually

Preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association's Epidemiology and Prevention/Nutrition, Physical Activity and Metabolism 2013 Scientific Sessions suggests sugary beverages are to blame for about 183,000 deaths worldwide each year, including 133,000 diabetes deaths, 44,000 heart disease deaths and 6,000 cancer deaths.

Among the 35 largest countries in the world, Mexico had the highest death rates associated with sugary beverage consumption. There, the average consumption of sugary beverages was 24 ounces per day.

Bangladesh had the lowest death rates. The U.S. ranked third, with an estimated 25,000 annual deaths from sweetened drinks. (Many might have expected the U.S. to come in first place, but remember that American processed foods contain far more sugars than other nations, so Americans also consume a lot of "hidden" sugar in products other than beverages.)

Interestingly, and quite disturbingly, the death rates associated with sweetened beverages were highest in those under the age of 45. According to the featured article:

While the connection between excess sugar and chronic disease is well-known, the latest research is the first to quantify deaths correlated with sugared drinks worldwide . To reach their conclusion, the scientists analyzed data from the 2010 Global Burden of Diseases Study and recorded how much sugar-sweetened beverages people drank, dividing up the data by age and sex. Then, they figured out how the various amount corresponded to obesity rates.

Lastly, they calculated how much obesity affected diabetes, heart disease and certain cancers and determined the mortality rates from these diseases, ending up with the number of deaths that could be attributed to consuming sugary beverages by age and sex.

Co-author Dr. Gitanjali Singh told Time Magazine:

Our findings should push policy makers world-wide to make effective policies to reduce consumption of sugary beverages, such as taxation, mass-media campaigns, and reducing availability of these drinks . Individuals should drink fewer sugary beverages and encourage their family and friends to do the same.

As you may recall, New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg recently tried to ban the sale of sugary beverages over 16 ounces in restaurants, food carts and theaters, but the day before the ban was scheduled to go into effect, a New York State Supreme Court judge overturned it. Bloomberg has stated he intends to appeal the decision.

Personally, I believe the most appropriate strategy is to educate people on the facts about sugar consumption, and encourage personal responsibility. Taxation and eliminating sweet drinks from schools and other venues may have a beneficial effect, but to really put a dent in the problem, you need to be properly informed about the consequences of your choices. Voting with your pocketbook and avoiding purchasing these products will cause them to disappear from the marketplace as companies will not produce items that don't sell.

Scientific Statement from American Heart Association about Sugar Consumption and Heart Disease Risk

In 2009, the American Heart Association (AHA) issued a scientific statement about sugar intake and heart health, pointing out that there is evidence for a relationship between the two. According to the abstract:

High intakes of dietary sugars in the setting of a worldwide pandemic of obesity and cardiovascular disease have heightened concerns about the adverse effects of excessive consumption of sugars.

In 2001 to 2004, the usual intake of added sugars for Americans was 22.2 teaspoons per day (355 calories per day). Between 1970 and 2005, average annual availability of sugars/added sugars increased by 19 percent, which added 76 calories to Americans' average daily energy intake. Soft drinks and other sugar-sweetened beverages are the primary source of added sugars in Americans' diets. Excessive consumption of sugars has been linked with several metabolic abnormalities and adverse health conditions, as well as shortfalls of essential nutrients .

The American Heart Association recommends reductions in the intake of added sugars. A prudent upper limit of intake is half of the discretionary calorie allowance, which for most American women is no more than 100 calories per day and for most American men is no more than 150 calories per day from added sugars.

Did You Know?

Artificially Sweetened Water is a Recipe for Poor Health

Different artificial sweeteners have been found to wreak havoc in a number of different ways. Aspartame, for example, has a long list of studies indicating its harmful potential effects, ranging from brain damage to pre-term delivery. Sucralose has been found to be particularly damaging to your intestines. A study published in 2008 found that sucralose:

  • Reduces the amount of good bacteria in your intestines by 50 percent
  • Increases the pH level in your intestines, and
  • Affects a glycoprotein in your body that can have crucial health effects, particularly if you're on certain medications like chemotherapy, or treatments for AIDS and certain heart conditions

In response to this study, James Turner, chairman of the national consumer education group Citizens for Health, issued the following statement:

The report makes it clear that the artificial sweetener Splenda and its key component sucralose pose a threat to the people who consume the product. Hundreds of consumers have complained to us about side effects from using Splenda and this study . confirms that the chemicals in the little yellow package should carry a big red warning label.

That was nearly five years ago, yet many are still in the dark about these health risks. Having healthy gut flora is absolutely vital for your optimal health, so clearly, any product that can destroy up to half of your healthy intestinal bacteria can pose a critical risk to your health! Many are already deficient in healthy bacteria due to consuming too many highly-processed foods. This is why I recommend eating fermented vegetables every day, or at the very least taking a high-quality probiotic.

Believe me, if you continuously destroy up to 50 percent of your gut flora by regularly consuming sucralose, then poor health is virtually guaranteed. So please, do not make "Fruitwater" a staple drink thinking you're doing something beneficial for your health. Remember, pure water is a zero-calorie drink. You cannot find a beverage that contains fewer calories. If you think about it, why on earth would you choose artificially-sweetened water over regular mineral water? If you want some flavor, just squeeze a little bit of fresh lemon or lime into mineral water, as they have virtually no fructose in them.

Unfortunately, most public health agencies and nutritionists in the United States still recommend these toxic artificial sweeteners as acceptable and even preferred alternatives to sugar, which is at best confusing and at worst seriously damaging the health of those who listen to this well-intentioned but foolish advice. Contrary to popular belief, research has shown that artificial sweeteners can stimulate your appetite, increase carbohydrate cravings, and stimulate fat storage and weight gain. In fact, diet sodas may actually double your risk of obesity. So much for being an ally in the battle against the bulge.

What's the Healthiest Beverage You Can Drink?

Sweetened beverages, whether it's sweetened with sugar, HFCS, naturally-occurring fructose, or artificial sweeteners, are among the worst culprits in the fight against obesity and related health problems, including diabetes and heart and liver disease, just to name a few. Remember that sweetened beverages also include flavored milk products, bottled teas, and "enhanced" water products. Ditching all of these types of beverages can go a long way toward reducing your risk for chronic health problems and weight gain. So what should you drink?

Your best, most cost effective choice is to drink filtered tap water. The caveat, though, is to make sure you filter your tap water. I've written a large number of articles on the hazards of tap water, from fluoride to dangerous chemicals and drugs, to toxic disinfection byproducts and heavy metals, so having a good filtration system in place is more of a necessity than a luxury in most areas. Remember, nothing beats pure water when it comes to serving your body's needs. If you really feel the urge for a carbonated beverage, try sparkling mineral water with a squirt of lime or lemon juice.


Sugary Drinks May Explain 180,000 Deaths Worldwide Each Year

NEW ORLEANS — A large, international epidemiologic study reports that slurping back large amounts of sugary beverages was associated with an increased body-mass index (BMI), which in turn was linked with BMI-related deaths from diabetes, cardiovascular disease (CVD), and cancer.

Specifically, the researchers found that in 2010, 132,000 deaths from diabetes, 44,000 deaths from CVD, and 6000 deaths from cancer in the world could be attributed to drinking sugar-sweetened soft drinks, fruit juice, or sports beverages.

The study byGitanjali Singh, PhD, from Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, and colleagues was reported at EPI|NPAM 2013, the Epidemiology and Prevention/Nutrition, Physical Activity and Metabolism 2013 Scientific Sessions.

“It is a [surprisingly] large number of deaths — tens of thousands of deaths — that are being caused by consuming sugary beverages,” Dr. Singh commented to Medscape Medical News. Three quarters of these BMI-related deaths were from diabetes, which “suggests that limiting sugary-beverage intake is an important step in reducing diabetes deaths,” she noted.

“Uphill Battle” to Change Patient Habits, Public Policy

The study reinforces the need for clinicians to encourage patients to drink fewer sugary beverages, Dr. Singh said. In addition, even though “it’s certainly an uphill battle [to change public policy] — it’s one that…physicians, cardiologists, public-health scientists, [and] policy makers…really need to advocate for and show support for,” she noted.

As part of the Global Burden of Disease study, the researchers obtained data from 114 national dietary surveys, representing more than 60% of the world’s population.

Based on data from large prospective cohort studies, they determined how changes in consumption of sugary drinks affected BMI, and next, how elevated BMI affected CVD, diabetes, and 7 obesity-related cancers (breast, uterine, esophageal, gallbladder, colorectal, kidney, and pancreatic cancer). Using data from the World Health Organization, they calculated the number of deaths from BMI-related CVD, diabetes, and cancer for men and for women aged 20 to 44, 45 to 64, and 65 years and older.

Average sugary-drink consumption varied tremendously — from less than 1 drink (8 oz) a day in elderly Chinese women to more than 5 drinks (40 oz) a day in younger Cuban men.

Most deaths (78%) from excess sugary drinks were in low- and middle-income countries.

Mexico, which has one of the world’s highest per capita rates of drinking sweetened drinks, had the greatest number of deaths related to this risk factor: 318 deaths per million adults.

In contrast, Japan, with one of the lowest per-capita rates of imbibing these beverages, had the smallest number of deaths attributable to this risk factor: about 10 deaths per million adults.

In 2010, drinking sugar-sweetened beverages was associated with about:

  • 38,000 deaths from diabetes in Latin American and Caribbean countries.
  • 11,000 deaths from CVD in Eastern- and Central-Eurasian countries.
  • 25,000 deaths in the United States.

“Sugar-sweetened beverages are a major cause of preventable deaths due to chronic diseases, not only in high-income countries, but also in low and middle-income countries,” the group concludes.

Bottom Line: Advise Patients to Avoid Sugary Drinks

“The evidence base that sugar-sweetened beverages are associated with excess weight gain is well established what these investigators have done is to take it a step further by saying the excess weight gain that is attributable to sugary drinks actually increases the risk of death from diabetes, CVD, and cancer,” American Heart Association(AHA) spokesperson Rachel K. Johnson, PhD, from the University of Vermont, Burlington, commented.

Study strengths include its large scope, but since it was an epidemiologic study, it does not demonstrate cause and effect, Johnson noted. Nevertheless, “it is certainly a [biologically] plausible association, and we should take it seriously,” she added.

According to Dr. Johnson, “The bottom line is to [advise patients to] avoid sugar-sweetened drinks, [since we have] more and more evidence that it’s not a good choice.”

It is “particularly problematic” that satiety mechanisms don’t kick in with beverages in the same way as with solid foods. “If you have a sugary drink at 4 o’clock, you’re not as likely to cut back on what you eat for dinner in the same way you would if you’d had a snack of solid food at 4 o’clock,” she said.

The AHA recommends that adults don’t exceed 450 calories a day or 36 oz a week from sugar-sweetened beverages. In a 2012 statement position statement, the AHA and American Diabetes Association stated that nonnutritive artificial sweeteners can be a tool to help people lower their added sugar and calorie intake, as long as they don’t eat extra calories to compensate for the lower calories in the diet drinks.


Roughly 180,000 deaths worldwide linked to sugary drink consumption

New Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) research suggests that roughly 180,000 obesity-related deaths worldwide—including 25,000 Americans—are associated with the consumption of sugary drinks. The abstract, presented at an American Heart Association scientific conference in New Orleans, linked drinking sugar-sweetened beverages to 133,000 diabetes deaths, 44,000 deaths from cardiovascular diseases, and 6,000 cancer deaths. The researchers found that 78% of these deaths were in low- and middle-income countries.

Of nine world regions, Latin America and the Caribbean had the most diabetes deaths related to sugary drink consumption (38,000), and East and Central Eurasia had the largest numbers of cardiovascular deaths (11,000). Of the world’s most populous nations, Mexico had the highest number of deaths attributable to over-consumption of sugary drinks and the United States was third. Japan had the fewest such deaths.

The finding that three-quarters of the deaths were from diabetes “suggests that limiting sugary-beverage intake is an important step in reducing diabetes deaths,” co-author [[Gitanjali Singh]], a postdoctoral research fellow at HSPH, said in a March 19, 2013 USA Today article.


Sugary Drinks Linked to 180,000 Deaths Worldwide

Consumption of soda and other sugar-sweetened beverages may contribute to hundreds of thousands of deaths around the world, mainly due to Type 2 diabetes, a new study says.

The results show sugar-sweetened beverage consumption is linked to 180,000 deaths a year worldwide, including 25,000 deaths a year in the United States, the researchers say.

Of the 15 most populated countries, Mexico had the highest rate of death linked to the beverages at 318 yearly deaths per million adults, and Japan had the lowest at 10 yearly deaths per million adults.

Earlier studies show drinking sugar-sweetened beverages increases the risk of chronic diseases such as diabetes, heart disease and cancer, and the new study provides an estimate just how big this problem is, the researchers said.

"Our findings should push policy makers world-wide to make effective policies to reduce consumption of sugary beverages, such as taxation, mass-media campaigns, and reducing availability of these drinks," said study researcher Gitanjali M. Singh, a postdoctoral research fellow at the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston, Mass.

However, experts cautioned the study found only an association, and cannot prove that sugar-sweetened beverage consumption caused these deaths. Sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) are often just part of a bad diet that contributes to poor health.

"Diets with more calories from SSBs are poorer diets overall," said Dr. David Katz, director of the Prevention Research Center at Yale University School of Medicine, who was not involved in the study. "They may also have more starch, or sodium, or trans fat, or chemicals, and almost certainly do," Katz said.

The new study included information from 114 countries, looking at dietary surveys to assess sugar-sweetened beverage consumption, as well the number of deaths from certain diseases. The researchers used information from earlier studies to estimate the effect of sugary drink consumption on weight gain, and, in turn, the effect of weight gain on the risk of death from cardiovascular disease, diabetes and cancer.

Overall, sugar-sweetened beverage consumption was linked to 133,000 deaths from diabetes, 44,000 deaths from cardiovascular diseases and 6,000 deaths from cancer.

Of nine world regions, Latin America/Caribbean had the most diabetes deaths at 38,000, and East/Central Eurasia had the most cardiovascular deaths at 11,000, in 2010.

Katz warned against becoming too preoccupied with any particular nutrient, as an earlier study found that excess salt intake was linked to 150,000 premature deaths worldwide. Instead, it's important to focus on overall diet, he said.

"If we improve the quality of diets, we improve both sugar intake, and salt intake and everything else, and will certainly have better health to show for it," Katz said. Cutting down on sugar-sweetened beverages, but eating more of other junk foods, could worsen health, he said.

In a statement, the American Beverage Association said, "The researchers make a huge leap when they take beverage intake calculations from around the globe and allege that those beverages are the cause of deaths which the authors themselves acknowledge are due to chronic disease."

The American Heart Association recommends adults consume no more than 450 calories per week from sugar-sweetened beverages, based on a 2,000 calorie per day diet.

The study will be presented today (March 19) at an American Heart Association meeting in New Orleans.

Pass it on: Consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages is linked to 180,000 deaths worldwide, but these beverages are likely just part of an overall poor diet.


Siobhan Gallagher

Share

BOSTON (June 29, 2015, 4 pm ET) — Consumption of sugary drinks may lead to an estimated 184,000 adult deaths each year worldwide, according to research published today in the journal Circulation and previously presented as an abstract at the American Heart Association Council on Epidemiology and Prevention in 2013.

“Many countries in the world have a significant number of deaths occurring from a single dietary factor, sugar-sweetened beverages. It should be a global priority to substantially reduce or eliminate sugar-sweetened beverages from the diet,” said Dariush Mozaffarian, M.D., Dr.P.H., senior author of the study and dean of the Friedman School of Nutrition Science & Policy at Tufts University in Boston.

In the first detailed global report on the impact of sugar-sweetened beverages, researchers estimated deaths and disabilities from diabetes, heart disease, and cancers in 2010. In this analysis, sugar sweetened beverages were defined as any sugar-sweetened sodas, fruit drinks, sports/energy drinks, sweetened iced teas, or homemade sugary drinks such as frescas, that contained at least 50 kcal per 8oz serving. 100 percent fruit juice was excluded.

Estimates of consumption were made from 62 dietary surveys including 611,971 individuals conducted between 1980 and 2010 across 51 countries, along with data on national availability of sugar in 187 countries and other information. This allowed capture of geographical, gender and age variation in consumption levels of sugar-sweetened beverages in different populations. Based on meta-analyses of other published evidence on health harms of sugar-sweetened beverages, the investigators calculated the direct impact on diabetes and the obesity-related effects on cardiovascular disease, diabetes and cancer.

In 2010, the researchers estimate that sugar-sweetened beverages consumption may have been responsible for approximately:

  • 133,000 deaths from diabetes
  • 45,000 deaths from cardiovascular disease
  • 6,450 deaths from cancer

“Some population dietary changes, such as increasing fruits and vegetables, can be challenging due to agriculture, costs, storage, and other complexities. This is not complicated. There are no health benefits from sugar-sweetened beverages, and the potential impact of reducing consumption is saving tens of thousands of deaths each year,” Mozaffarian said.

The impact of sugar-sweetened beverages varied greatly between populations. At the extremes, the estimated percentage of deaths was less than 1 percent in Japanese over 65 years old, but 30 percent in Mexican adults younger than 45.

Of the 20 most populous countries, Mexico had the highest death rate attributable to sugar-sweetened beverages with an estimated 405 deaths per million adults (24,000 total deaths) and the U.S. ranked second with an estimated 125 deaths per million adults (25,000 total deaths).

About 76 percent of the estimated sugar-sweetened beverage-related deaths occurred in low- or middle-income countries.

In nations of the Caribbean and Latin America, such as Mexico, homemade sugary drinks (e.g. frescas) are popular and consumed in addition to commercially prepared sugar-sweetened beverages. “Among the 20 countries with the highest estimated sugar-sweetened beverage-related deaths, at least 8 were in Latin America and the Caribbean, reflecting the high intakes in that region of the world,” said Gitanjali Singh, Ph.D., lead author of the study and a research assistant professor at the Friedman School.

Overall, in younger adults, the percent of chronic disease attributed to sugar-sweetened beverages was higher than the percent in older adults.

“The health impact of sugar-sweetened beverage intake on the young is important because younger adults form a large sector of the workforce in many countries, so the economic impact of sugar-sweetened beverage-related deaths and disability in this age group can be significant. It also raises concerns about the future. If these young people continue to consume high levels as they age, the effects of high consumption will be compounded by the effects of aging, leading to even higher death and disability rates from heart disease and diabetes than we are seeing now,” Singh said.

Other co-authors are Renata Micha, Ph.D. Shahab Khatibzadeh, M.D. Stephen Lim, Ph.D. and Majid Ezzati, Ph.D. Author disclosures are on the manuscript.

Singh was supported by a training grant from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (DK007703) and a K00/R00 Pathway to Independence Award from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (1K99HL124321). Initial data collection for this work was supported by a grant from The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to the 2010 Global Burden of Diseases study.

Singh GM, Micha R, Khatibzadeh S, Lim S, Ezzati M, and Mozaffarian, D. “Estimated global, regional, and national disease burdens related to sugar-sweetened beverage consumption in 2010.” Circulation. Published online ahead of print 06-29-15. doi:10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.114.010636

About the Friedman School of Nutrition Science & Policy

For three decades, the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University has studied the relationship between good nutrition and good health in aging populations. Tufts research scientists work with federal agencies to establish the USDA Dietary Guidelines, the Dietary Reference Intakes, and other significant public policies. The Gerald J. and Dorothy R. Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University is the only independent school of nutrition in the United States. The school's eight degree programs – which focus on questions relating to nutrition and chronic diseases, molecular nutrition, agriculture and sustainability, food security, humanitarian assistance, public health nutrition, and food policy and economics – are renowned for the application of scientific research to national and international policy.


This Just In: Sugary Drinks Can Be Deadly

If you&rsquore still struggling with a soda habit, this new research might be just what you need to abstain from the sweet stuff: About 180,000 deaths around the world may be associated with sugar-sweetened beverages each year , according to a new study presented today at the American Heart Association&rsquos spring meeting in New Orleans. In fact, about 25,000 U.S. deaths were linked to the consumption of sugary drinks in 2010 alone.

To come to this conclusion, researchers from the Harvard School of Public Health looked at the amount of sugary drinks being consumed worldwide, as well as the number of deaths related to obesity and diabetes (two proven long-term effects of consuming too much sugar and too many calories). Based on previous research, they knew how the consumption of these beverages would factor into a person&rsquos risk of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and certain cancers. From there, they were able to determine how many of those deaths were likely caused by sugar-laden drinks. And they weren&rsquot just looking at something you buy in a Big Gulp cup&mdashsugar-sweetened beverages include sports drinks and fruit juices, as well as sodas.

&ldquoWhen you drink a sugary beverage, you&rsquore consuming a large number of calories, but it doesn&rsquot make you feel full and it doesn&rsquot have a lot of other nutritional value,&rdquo says study co-author Gitanjali Singh, PhD, postdoctoral research fellow at the Harvard School of Public Health. Plus, all that sugar can disrupt your body&rsquos ability to regulate blood sugar levels. The result is a lethal combination: Not only are you packing on extra pounds, but you&rsquore also screwing with your blood sugar, which can set you up for diabetes.

The American Health Association recommends cutting yourself off after you&rsquove consumed 450 calories from sugar-sweetened beverages each week. &ldquoIdeally, it would be better to limit consumption as much as possible,&rdquo says Singh.

Need help stepping away from the sweet stuff? Here, more motivation and strategies for skipping sugary drinks:


Sugary drinks linked to staggering 180,000 deaths each year: study

Researchers at Harvard University say sugary drinks are contributing to an estimated 180,000 deaths around the globe annually, a startling statistic they hope will spur changes in the beverage industry.

Researchers from Harvard’s School of Public Health say sugar-laced juices, sports drinks and soda are major factors behind spiking rates of obesity and diabetes.

The study relied on data obtained from 114 national dietary surveys, representing more than 60 per cent of the world's population. The researchers determined how changes in consumption of sugary drinks affected weight and body mass index, controlling for other factors known to weight, such as changes in physical activity levels and the consumption of other foods and drink.

They then calculated the number of deaths from weight-related heart disease, diabetes, and seven obesity-related cancers (breast, gallbladder, colorectal, kidney, pancreatic, uterine and esophageal cancer).

The researchers linked the overconsumption of sugared beverages to 44,000 deaths annually from heart disease and stroke, 133,000 deaths linked to diabetes and 6,000 cancer deaths worldwide.

“The data is clear,” said Dr. Dariush Mozaffarian, co-director of the cardiovascular epidemiology program at the Harvard School of Public Health. “Too much soda consumption is killing people.”

They found that countries in the Caribbean and Latin America saw the highest death rates from diabetes due too sugary drinks. In the United States, where two-thirds of adults and one in three children are overweight or obese, sugar-sweetened drinks were linked to 25,000 deaths in 2010.

Mozaffarian said the research could motivate policy makers to regulate the beverage industry.

“Our data really provide an impetus for policy makers to make changes when they see tens of thousands of deaths are due to this beverage consumption,” said Gitanjali Singh, of the Harvard School of Public Health.

A debate over super-sized sodas is raging in New York City, where a city-wide ban on the sale of sugary drinks in containers holding more than 16 ounces was to go into effect earlier this month. However, a last-minute ruling by a Supreme Court Justice blocked the ban.

According to a sugar drink fact sheet published by Harvard’s School of Public Heath, a typical 590-millilitre soda contains between 15 to 18 teaspoons of sugar and upwards of 240 calories.

“People who drink this ‘liquid candy’ do not feel as full as if they has eaten the same calories from solid food and do not compensate by eating less,” reads the report.

In the meantime, beverage companies continue to spend billions each year on advertising -- with an estimated half a billion dollars in marketing aimed at children and youth between two and 17 years old.

“In 2010, for example, preschoolers viewed an average of 213 ads for sugary drinks and energy drinks, while children and teens watched an average of 277 and 406 ads, respectively,” reads the report.

Sugary drinks are the number one source of calories in North America and doctors hope more research will prompt consumers and governments to make a change.

“I think we are going to see regulations and legislations put in place,” said Ottawa-based weight loss specialist Dr. Yoni Freedhoff. “Whether it is taxes or cup-size bans, it is not a matter of ‘if’, it’s a matter of ‘when’.”

He continued: “The writing is on the wall, and I think the soda pop industry knows that.”

The Canadian Beverage Association, on the other hand, disputes the findings and suggests there are much bigger problems at the root of rising obesity.

"The Canadian Beverage Association feels that it is over simplistic and naive to believe that one single food or beverage can be held responsible for obesity," the group said in a statement responding to the study. "Obesity is affected by lifestyle, such as diet and physical activity, as well as inherited and social influences, not simply one particular food or beverage."

The study was reported at the American Heart Association's EPI|NPAM 2013 conference (Epidemiology and Prevention/Nutrition, Physical Activity and Metabolism), and has not yet been published.

With a report from CTV’s medical specialist Avis Favaro and producer Elizabeth St. Philip

In this July 9, 2012 file photo, protester Eric Moore sips on an extra-large beverage during a protest against Mayor Michael Bloomberg's proposal to prohibit licensed food establishments from using containers larger than 16 ounces to serve high-calorie drinks at City Hall in New York. (AP / Kathy Willens)

Dr. Yoni Freedhoff from the Bariatric Medical Institute believes regulations and legislations will be put in place to regulate for sugary drink consumption.

Dr. Dariush Mozaffarian of Harvard's School of Public Health speaks to CTV News about the link between sugary drink consumption and obesity.


180,000 deaths worldwide each year may be associated with sugary soft drinks, research suggests

Sugar-sweetened sodas, sports drinks and fruit drinks may be associated with about 180,000 deaths around the world each year, according to research presented at the American Heart Association's Epidemiology and Prevention/Nutrition, Physical Activity and Metabolism 2013 Scientific Sessions.

Sugar-sweetened beverages are consumed throughout the world, and contribute to excess body weight, which increases the risk of developing diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and some cancers. Using data collected as part of the 2010 Global Burden of Diseases Study, the researchers linked intake of sugar- sweetened beverages to 133,000 diabetes deaths, 44,000 deaths from cardiovascular diseases and 6,000 cancer deaths. Seventy-eight percent of these deaths due to over-consuming sugary drinks were in low and middle-income countries, rather than high-income countries.

"In the U.S., our research shows that about 25,000 deaths in 2010 were linked to drinking sugar-sweetened beverages," said Gitanjali M. Singh, Ph.D., co-author of the study and a postdoctoral research fellow at the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston, Mass.

Researchers calculated the quantities of sugar-sweetened beverage intake around the world by age and sex the effects of this consumption on obesity and diabetes and the impact of obesity and diabetes-related deaths. Of nine world regions, Latin America/Caribbean had the most diabetes deaths (38,000) related to the consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages in 2010. East/Central Eurasia had the largest numbers of cardiovascular deaths (11,000) related to sugary beverage consumption in 2010. Among the world's 15 most populous countries, Mexico -- one of the countries with the highest per-capita consumption of sugary beverages in the world -- had the highest death rate due to these beverages, with 318 deaths per million adults linked to sugar-sweetened beverage intake.

Japan, one of the countries with lowest per-capita consumption of sugary beverages in the world, had the lowest death rate associated with the consumption of sugary beverages, at about 10 deaths due to per million adults.

"Because we were focused on deaths due to chronic diseases, our study focused on adults. Future research should assess the amount of sugary beverage consumption in children across the world and how this affects their current and future health," Singh said.

The Global Burden of Disease Study 2010 is an international, collaborative, systematic effort to quantify the global distribution and causes of major diseases, injuries and health risk factors.

The American Heart Association recommends adults consume no more than 450 calories per week, from sugar-sweetened beverages , based on a 2,000 calorie diet and offers tips on how Life's Simple 7&trade can help you make better lifestyle choices and eat healthier.


Sugary drinks linked to 180,000 deaths worldwide

(CNN) — Sugar-sweetened beverages are linked to more than 180,000 obesity-related deaths worldwide each year, according to new research presented this week at an American Heart Association conference.

“This means about one in every 100 deaths from obesity-related diseases is caused by drinking sugary beverages,” says study author Gitanjali Singh, a postdoctoral research fellow at the Harvard School of Public Health.

Among the world’s 35 largest countries, Mexico had the highest death rates from sugary drinks, and Bangladesh had the lowest, according to the study. The United States ranked third.

However, the American Beverage Association dismissed the research as “more about sensationalism than science.”

When people drink too many beverages containing added sugar, such as soft drinks, fruit drinks, energy or sports beverages, they tend to put on weight. The study authors say these added pounds increase the risk of developing diabetes, cardiovascular disease and some cancers — conditions often referred to as obesity-related diseases.

Researchers at Harvard wanted to find out how often people around the globe drank sugar-sweetened beverages and how that affected their risk of death. They looked at 114 national dietary surveys covering more than 60% of the world’s population. They also used evidence from studies published in medical journals that discussed sugary drinks and other dietary habits. Their data was included in the 2010 Global Burden of Disease Study, which looks at the health and mortality of populations across the world.

How did the Harvard scientists single out that sweet drinks were linked to weight gain and death? They spent several years gathering and combing through data. They looked at all kind of factors that can affect our weight such as TV watching, changes in physical activity levels, smoking and the consumption of all kinds of food and drink.

When the researchers controlled for these factors, they were able to determine what percentage of deaths from diabetes, heart disease and cancer were linked to sugary drinks.

“The investigators examined changes in sugar-sweetened beverage consumption and then its association with change in body fatness or BMI (body mass index), and subsequent deaths from cardiovascular disease, diabetes and cancer,” says Rachel Johnson, professor of nutrition at the University of Vermont in Burlington, who was not involved in the study.

Scientists found that more people died from diabetes, heart disease and cancer in parts of the world where consumption of sugary drinks is high.

Of the nine world regions in 2010, Latin America and the Caribbean had the most diabetes deaths linked to sugary drinks with 38,000. East and Central Eurasia had the most cardiovascular deaths at 11,000.

In the United States, sugary drinks were linked to the deaths of 25,000 people from diabetes and other obesity-related diseases. As in many other countries, the death rates were highest in young adults under age 45, with one in 10 obesity-related deaths associated with sugary beverages.

“Almost three-quarters of the deaths caused by sugary drinks are in low and middle income countries,” says study author Dr. Dariush Mozaffarian, co-director of the cardiovascular epidemiology program at the Harvard School of Public Health. “So this is not just a problem in wealthy nations.”

The average consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages in Mexico, the country with the highest death rates among larger nations, was 24 ounces per day.

The American Beverage Association released this statement in response to the study:

“This abstract, which is neither peer-reviewed nor published, is more about sensationalism than science. In no way does it show that consuming sugar-sweetened beverages causes chronic diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease or cancer – the real causes of death among the studied subjects.

“The researchers make a huge leap when they illogically and wrongly take beverage intake calculations from around the globe and allege that those beverages are the cause of deaths which the authors themselves acknowledge are due to chronic disease.”

The study authors and other experts disagree.

“We know having an elevated BMI is associated with an increase risk of heart disease, diabetes and some cancers,” says Johnson. “The body does not seem to detect fullness as well when you drink sugary drinks. That is one explanation for why sugar-sweetened beverages are associated with obesity.”

Recently the American Heart Association came out with a scientific statement about sugar intake and heart health because it says there is new evidence about the relationship between the two. The statement says some research has found a link between sugar consumption and cardiovascular disease, while other research has not found a direct link.

The AHA says that the best way to maintain a healthy weight and to decrease the risk of heart disease is to eat a healthy diet and to limit added sugar to no more than 100 calories a day for women and 150 for men.

Soft drinks and other sugar-sweetened beverages are the main source of added sugars in the American diet, according to the statement. One 12-ounce regular soda contains the equivalent of 10 teaspoons of sugar and has about 140 calories.


Watch the video: 180,000 deaths worldwide may be associated with sugary soft drinks (July 2022).


Comments:

  1. Gadhra

    I consider, that you are not right. I can prove it. Write to me in PM, we will talk.

  2. Fitzgerald

    It is miraculous!

  3. Kiran

    I think you are making a mistake. I can prove it. Email me at PM.

  4. Pyn

    I'm waiting for the continuation of the post ...;)

  5. Gurutz

    Agree, this very good idea is just about



Write a message